2003 Consumer Confidence Report

IF YOU REQUIRE A PAPER COPY, PLEASE CONTACT CLERK JANE MAHEUX AT 802-899-3810 OR PRESIDENT PETER MITCHELL AT 802-899-4076 OR WRITE THE DISTRICT AT PO BOX 174, UNDERHILL, VT. 05489


2013-04-11 23:44:26


JERICHO-UNDERHILL WATER DISTRICT

CONSUMER WATER QUALITY REPORT - JULY 1, 2003

FOR THE YEAR 2002

This report addresses the quality of water which we provided you from January 1 through December 31, 2002. It also includes water quality information from other years for constituents not tested for during 2002. Our goal is to provide you with an adequate amount of safe and esthetically pleasing drinking water. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards. Our groundwater source is pumped from two gravel wells 175 feet deep situated 54 feet apart. The screens rest near the well bottoms below several layers of soil. Two important layers of this soil are compacted till and clay. Both these soil types are almost impenetrable and are extremely effective in preventing any nearby contaminants from reaching our water supply source.

Public Water System Name:Jericho-Underhill Water District

Report Date:July 1, 2003

Establishment of System:This municipal entity was established by legislative charter in 1961. Its predecessor was the Underhill Water Company which distributed water drawn from north of the village area up off Poker Hill Road..

WSID#:5096. Water Supply IDentification number.

Town: Portions of Underhill and Jericho.

Services: Serves approximately 800 people through 298 served living units, two schools, three churches and various businesses. The District maintains approximately 4 miles of 8 inch water mains, a 250,000 gallon steel storage tank, a cistern, a control building and two gravel wells. The District also owns a back-up (former) source of several shallow well points, a pumphouse, a storage building, two deep wells and test wells; and a spring (an earlier) source.

Health Information Regarding Drinking Water

This section explains how to obtain more information about drinking water. Some people are more susceptible to constituents in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people such as those undergoing chemotherapy, people who have received organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, the elderly and infants, are more at risk to developing disease from water borne sources of contamination than other more healthy people. People in the high risk category above should seek advice from their health care providers regarding the water they drink. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to reduce the health risk from potential water borne disease organisms and other contaminants are available and can be obtained by calling EPA's safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain harmless amounts of constituents, which, in greater concentrations, could represent an important contaminant. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a

significant health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be

obtained by calling the Safe Drinking water Hotline (1-800-426-4791). You may also call our

State certified operator Marc Maheux (899-2660) for information.

Water Source Information

Our water sources are:

Source Name:WELL 1

Location:On Jericho-Underhill Town Line at 52 River Road, and approximately 240 feet south of Brown's River.

Vermont Source Type:Gravel Developed Well (with screen)

EPA Source Type:Groundwater, non-purchased

Source Name:WELL 2

Location:On Jericho-Underhill Town Line at 52 River Road, and approximately 200 feet south of Brown's River.

Vermont Source Type: Gravel Packed Well

EPA Source Type:Groundwater, non-purchased

Source Name:WELL POINTS (~12)

Location:80 feet east of The Creek in Underhill due west of 431 Vermont Route 15

Vermont Source Type:Well Points, Gravel Developed (held as a backup source)

EPA Source Type:Groundwater, non-purchased.

Source Name:SPRING

Location:North of (behind) barn at 379 Vermont Route 15 in Jericho.

Vermont Source Type:Spring (held as a backup source)

EPA Source Type:Groundwater, non-purchased.

Source Protection Plan: We have a source protection plan and report available from our clerk that provides information about existing and potential sources of contamination. The Water Supply Division approved our source protection plan on: 7/23/96. This document was developed by our operator, Marc Maheux and was updated most recently June 5, 2001. A copy of the Source Protection plans can be viewed on the District website or by contacting the Jane Maheux, Clerk at 899-3810.

Owner/Operator and Public Participation Opportunities

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your drinking water quality, please contact persons listed below. We want our customers to be informed about their water quality. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. All meetings are public meetings.

Peter Mitchell, President Roger Koniuto, Trustee

Jericho-Underhill Water District 899-3129

P.O. Box 174, Underhill, Vermont 05489-0174

899-4076 Richard Eldred, Trustee

899-3871

Marc Maheux, Chief Operator

P.O. Box 236 Jane Maheux, Clerk, Treasurer

Underhill, Vermont 05489-0236 899-3810

899-2660

Regularly Scheduled Meetings are held on:

Date:First Monday of each month. Please note that occasionally our meetings are postponed a week to avoid meeting on holidays.

Time:7:00 p.m.

Location:Basement of the United Church of Underhill at the Park in Underhill Flats.

The District maintains a website at: http://water.jerichounderhill.com

The district website contains information about the Jericho Underhill Water District and links to other websites containing drinking water information.

Sources of Drinking Water and Potential Contaminants

The source of our water is two deep wells near the Jericho-Underhill town line a couple hundred feet south of the Browns River. Our system's susceptibility to potential sources of contamination is at a low risk due to the two impeding layers of till and clay that lie above the zone from which we draw our water. However, we're not certain where these layers "pinch out" or become too thin to be of benefit. Thus, a tank truck accident on River Road might threaten our wells if the liquid being spilled were to be oil, gasoline or other significant contaminant. Some threat exists from farming activities where pesticides and fertilizers may be used within the watershed area. A buried gasoline tanks site in Underhill Center which poses a threat to our source is being remediated. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occuring minerals and, in some cases it absorbs radioactive material, and can pick up biological substances resulting from the presence of animals or human activity. Our deep well water has been naturally filtered over several years thus providing time for most disease organisms to die off prior to pumping our wells.

Contaminants that might bein our source water before we treat it are listed below:

*Microbial organisms, such as viruses and bacteria originate from septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife and are constantly being renewed in our environment. Our deep well water has been naturally filtered over several years providing time for organisms to die off prior to pumping our wells.

*Inorganic chemicals, such as salts and minerals can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, road salt storage, mining, gravel pit operations, farming.

*Synthetic Organic Chemicals (Pesticides and Herbicides)reach our environment and may reach our water in small amounts from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

*Volatile Organic Chemicals,including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes, can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, septic systems, and careless disposal of household chemicals.

*Naturally occurring radioactive contaminantscome from natural geologic formations. There are not any dump sites of radioactive material in the vicinity of our wells.

In order to insure that our tap water is safe to drink, EPA and the State of Vermont prescribed and adopted regulations which limit the amount of specific contaminants permitted in water provided by public systems. The District water is tested regularly for conformance to these standards. The FDA and state regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same high protection for public health.

DRINKING WATER QUALITY DATA

The tables found later in this report list all the drinking water contaminants detected during the 2002 calendar year. Test values from the last five years and, in some cases, earlier years which were reported in last year's report are included for comparison and your information. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk because of their small amounts and countermeasures employed. The new data presented in these tables is from testing performed January 1 through December 31, 2002.

Terms and abbreviations- In this table you may find terms you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we have provided the following definitions:

* Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): the Federal agency that oversees state drinking water programs.

* State Drinking Water Program of Agency of Environmental Conservation (AEC): state agency in charge of public water systems.

* Maximum Contamination Level Goal (MCLG):The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or anticipated risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

.

* Maximum Contamination Level (MCL):The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as is reasonable and feasible using the best available treatment.

* Secondary Maximum Contamination Level (SMCL):A Secondary MCL is a non-health related guideline used to assess the aesthetic qualities of water such as taste, odor, and color.

* 90th Percentile:Ninety percent of the samples are below the action level. (For example: Nine of ten sites sampled were at or below this level.)

* Action Level:The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must install or follow.

* Treatment Technique (TT):A required process intended to reduce the level of a specific contaminant in drinking water.

* Units:Parts per million(ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) is essentially a quantity equal to one part in a million.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Microgram per liter (mcg/L or mg/L) is essentially a quantity equal to one part per billion.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) is a unit of radioactive material, and in this context a measure of radioactivity in water.

N/A: Not applicable

* VOCsmean Volatile Organic Compounds.

* SOCsmean Synthetic Organic Compounds

*Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG):The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of disinfectants in controlling microbial contaminants.

*Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL):The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. Addition of a disinfectant may help control microbial contaminants.

* Turbidityis caused by particulate matter making water appear roily, cloudy in appearance.

* Pathogenicmeans capable of causing disease.

* Coloris caused by material in solution, such as from leaves or other substances that have been dissolved in water.

*Variance and Exemptions:State or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions.

Level of Detected Contaminants

TABLE 1

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL MCLG Sample Date Violation Probable Source of Contamination
1. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

(Not including Tri-halo-

methanes)

NONE

NONE

NONE

NONE

NONE

ppb

 

Vari- ous levels.

Differ-ent for each constituent.

 

Varies with each constitu-

ent.

6/3/98

5/7/99

5/3/00

4/10/01

4/5/02

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

Chlorine, gasoline, solvents, household chemicals

Table 1 above shows the results of testing for VOCs. In 2002, of the 58 VOCs tested for using EPA Method 524.2, none were detected at the 0.5 ug/l (ppb) method quantification limit. A list of chemicals tested for will be provided on request. Call 899-2891 or 899-3810 for this information.

TABLE 2

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL MCLG Sample Date Violation Probable Source of Contamination
2. Tri-halo-

methanes

4.5

None

3.5

None

None

ppb 100

 

N/A 6/3/98

5/7/99

5/3/00

4/10/01

4/5/02

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

Produced as a by product of chlorination
Chloroform 2.3

0.6

1.8

None

None

ppb N/A 0 6/3/98

5/7/99

5/3/00

4/10/01

4/5/02

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

Produced as a by product of chlorination

Table 2 shows the results of testing for tri-halomethanes in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002. The 2002 Method Quantification Limit for all VOC's was 0.5 micrograms/liter (0.5 ppb). The results were no trihalomethanes or chloroform were detected. Tri-halomethanes are volatile organic compounds represented by four chemicals formed when chlorine combines with carbon organic matter. This group of chemicals is usually associated with surface water supplies which have more organic material in their water than do groundwater sources such as ours.

TABLE 3

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL MCLG Sample Date Violation Probable Source of Contamination
3.a. Fecal Coliform Present

Absent all samples in 1999

Not detected in 2000

Not detected in 2001

Not detected in 2002

Colonies per 100 Milliliters A routine sample & repeat sample are total coliform positive, & one is also fecal coliform or E.Coli positive

 

0 6/1//98

Month- ly in 1999

Month- ly in 2000

Month-

ly in 2001

Month-

ly in

2002

YES*

in 1998

NO

in 1999

NO

in 2000

NO

in 2001

NO

In 2002

Human or animal fecal waste.
3.b. Total Coliform Present

Absent all samples in 1999

Not detected in 2000

Detected June 2001; absent on retest

Not detected in 2002

  Presence of coliform in 5% of monthly samples 0 6/1/98

Month- ly in 1999

Month-

ly in 2000

Month-

ly in

2001

Month-

Ly in 2002

NO

in 1998

NO

in 1999

NO

in 2000

NO

in 2001

NO

in 2002

Naturally present in the environment.

* NO after chlorination.

Table 3 above Item 3.b. shows results of a positive test for coliform bacteria on 6/1/98. Coliform bacteria are indicator organisms that, when present in a water supply, suggest that the water may be contaminated with pathogenic biological contaminants. On June 2, 1998 the chlorinator was turned up to provide increased disinfect ion capability. Five follow-up samples were collected when we learned of the contaminated sample. This included sampling at the contaminated sample point and the raw untreated water sampling point. All five samples were negative for coliform bacteria as were the five samples collected in July 1998. We normally sample once per month for coliform bacteria. We theorize that a break in a plastic service line which existed just a few feet from an active sewage dry well may have permitted contaminated ground water to be drawn into the water pipe system during hydrant flushing causing the positive bacteria sample. The service line was replaced in the spring of 1999 by the customer, using approved Type K copper pipe. There was no identified outbreak of disease and no one reported any illnesses of a water borne nature to us at the time of the bad sample. The chlorinator continues to inject a small amount of chlorine into our water to maintain a low level of disinfectant to help protect against invasion by unexpected sources of biological contamination. Many samples for bacteriological analysis have been collected from the raw water tap in the Control Building since going "on line" in 1992. The state lab reported every sample up to June 1998 as negative for coliform bacteria. All bacteriological samples to December 31, 2000, since the June 1998 episode were negative for coliform bacteria.

In June 2001 total coliform was again reported positive. No reason for this result was identified. Testing of 5 followup samples from various locations in the district in June 2001 and July 2001 were negative, ie total coliform was not detected. The board assumes the positive result was due to a procedural error in either the sampling or the analysis of the sample. As a precaution the board continues to treat the water with a small amount of chlorine.

District bacteriological testing is performed by the State Health Laboratory in Burlington, Vermont.

TABLE 4

Contaminant Level Detected

(90th Percen- tile)

 

Units Action Level Sample Date

 

# of Sites that exceeded the Action Level Total # of Sites Sampled Violation

 

Probable Source of Contamination
Copper 0.77

0.15

0.18

mg/L

mg/L

mg/L

1.3 Aug. 1996

Sept. 1997

Aug.

2000

0

0

0

10 NO

NO

NO

Copper pipe
Lead 0.037

<.005

<5

mg/L

mg/L

ppb

0.015

0.015

15

Aug. 1996

Sept. 1997

Aug. 2000

1

0

0

10 YES *

NO

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing

*Note: "NO" on retest. See below.

Table 4 above shows results of copper and lead samples collected in 1996, 1997 and 2000. Sampling was not required in 2002. Elevated concentrations of copper in drinking water will cause stomach cramps and nausea. In Vermont, copper, when present in drinking water, usually has been dissolved from copper service lines or copper plumbing. We have not had any copper violations. The limit for copper is 1.3 mg/L and the highest copper result we obtained historically was 0.77 mg/L in 1996. Lead is a nonessential element (for human metabolism). Ingesting excessive amounts of lead can cause mental retardation in children during their early developmental years of 0 to 6. When present in drinking water, it usually has been dissolved from lead solder, lead pipes, or perhaps plumbing fixtures that convey the drinking water. Most lead poisonings, however, occur from ingesting old paint that contains lead. The 1996 lead sample from our water system that exceeded the Action Level was 0.037 mg/L. An immediate follow-up sample was collected at the same sample point of the 0.037mg/L test result, and it was also found to be 0.006 mg/L, two and a half times lower than the Action Level of 0.015 mg/L and all samples were below the Action Level. Of the ten draw samples collected and analyzed in 1997, the 90 percentile value, which is the one the state uses to determine the pass/fail status of the sampling protocol was well below the Action Level of 0.015 mg/L at 0.006 mg/L. The District water does not have a lead or copper contamination problem associated with its drinking water. This is based on 71 samples taken from 1994 through 1997 as well as ten samples in 2000. We were not required to sample in 1998 or 1999 based on this favorable record. The ten copper and lead samples taken in 2000 confirmed copper and lead contamination is not a problem. As listed in Table 4, the copper and lead 90th Percentile values were well below the action limits. At present copper and lead sampling is scheduled for every three years. The next sample is scheduled for 2003.

TABLE 5

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL Sample Date Violation Probable Sources
Synthetic Organic Compounds (SOCs) None detected

None detected

ppb Varies 2/24/98

8/27/01

NO

NO

Pesticides from farm and household use.

 

Table 5 above refers to SOC testing in 1998 (tested for presence of 43 materials), and 2001 (tested for presence of 38 materials). No SOCs were detected. The SOCs are manufactured chemicals, the majority of which are pesticides. Some are used today and some have been banned by the EPA, but linger in the environment. Atrozine, fo/r example, is commonly used on corn fields, but Dieldrin has been taken off the market.

If you are interested in seeing the list of the SOCs that were tested for and the "less than" laboratory results, please call 899-2981 or 899-3810 for this information. The next SOC sampling is scheduled for the first quarter of 2004.

TABLE 6

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL Sample Date Violation Probable Sources
Cyanide <0.010

<0.010

mg/L

mg/L

0.2 mg/L

0.2 mg/L

9/15/98

7/9/01

NO

NO

Natural or industrial sources.

Table 6 above refers to cyanide testing in 1998 and 2001. None was detected by the laboratory in the sample we submitted. Cyanide is not a common contaminant in Vermont. It can come from industrial or commercial uses and occasionally from certain plants. The next cyanide test is scheduled for the third quarter of 2004.

TABLE 7

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL Sample Date Violation Probable Sources
Nitrate

Nitrate

Nitrate

Nitrate

Nitrate

<0.5

<0.5

<0.5

<0.5

<0.5

mg/L

mg/L

mg/L

mg/L

mg/L

10 mg/L

10 mg/L

10 mg/L

10 mg/L

10 mg/L

2/23/98

3/9/99

3/15/00

3/8/01

2/7/02

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

Decaying organic matter, dead animals, organic wastes, septic systems

Table 7 refers to Nitrate testing for 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002. None was detected by the state lab. Nitrate (NO3) is a bi-product of decomposition of organic matter. It is a common contaminant from live stock farm operations, typically out west, but can occur anywhere. Its presence gives rise to investigation of its source because other disease-causing organisms may also be present. Nitrate itself, at elevated levels (above 10 mg/L but usually > 20 mg/L) can cause methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome) in babies up to six months of age. Oxygen is prevented from being carried to the various parts of the body because of their immature digestive systems which converts the nitrate to metheglobin which impedes oxygen transport in the blood. However, nitrate is also an important marker to warn if organic matter and associated contaminants may be finding their way into our water. This test is required and is performed annually. So far, all results on our new system (new wells used since 1992) have been <0.5 mg/L.

TABLE 8

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL Sample Date Violation Probable Sources
Gross Alpha Activity 1.11

0.85

pCi/L

pCi/L

15

5**

6/3/98 NO Natural
Radon Activity 144 pCi/L 300* 7/24/95 NO Natural
Radium-226 <0.11 pCi/L 5*** 4/5/02 NO Natural
Radium-228 <0.16 pCi/L 5*** 4/5/02 NO Natural

Notes: * proposed by EPA. ** If >5 requires further testing. ***Combination 226 and 228.

Table 8 above shows results of radiological testing for 1995, 1998, and 2002. There were no violations. Radioactive products have been associated with causing cancer. As noted, the radioactivity that showed up in our water is well below the established standards.

TABLE 9

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL Sample Date Violation Probable Source
Asbestos <0.155 Million Fibers per Liter 7 12/20/95 NO Natural and/or Water Mains

Table 9 shows results of testing for asbestos fibers in 1995. There was no violation. For many years we were suspicious that asbestos in drinking water might represent a health hazard to those who ingested it. However, more than fifty government-funded studies have been conducted and only one suggested there might be a relationship between ingesting water with asbestos fibers and disease. It can be a health hazard when breathed. Nevertheless, the EPA established an asbestos standard for drinking water at 7 million fibers per liter. We were pleased to see that our water was below detection capability of the approved laboratory that performed the test in 1995. Less than 155,000 fibers per liter is extremely low compared to the standard of 7.0 million fibers per liter. The water mains that convey our water are made from water, portland cement, sand, and asbestos fibers. However, the mains are lined with a bitumin material to protect the concrete from being dissolved and breaking loose asbestos fibers. The test result, which was made on a sample point on a dead end (worst case scenario), supports the contention that the pipe is not deteriorating. Also, examination by Harold Sargent of pipe "plugs" from recent (1998, 1999, 2000) taps into the pipe also support this observation of pipe stability. Asbestos will be tested next in fourth quarter of 2004.

TABLE 10

Contaminant Level Detected Units MCL Sample Date Violation Probable Source
Inorganic Chemicals   mg/l(ppm)   3/18/97 NO Natural
Antimony <0.004

<0.004

"

"

0.006

0.006

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Arsenic 2

0.002

mcg/l

mg/l(ppm)

10

0.010

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Barium <0.01

<0.01

mg/l(ppm) 2.00

2.00

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Beryllium <0.001

<0.001

" 0.004

0.004

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Cadmium <0.001

<0.001

" 0.005

0.005

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Chromium <0.005

<0.005

" 0.100

0.100

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Fluoride 0.2

1.1

" 4

4

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

Natural & Injected
Mercury <0.0005

<0.0002

" 0.002

0.002

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

Natural

"

Nickel <0.005

<0.005

" 0.100

0.100

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Selenium <0.005

<0.005

" 0.050

0.050

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Thallium <0.001

<0.001

" 0.0020

0.0020

3/18/97

5/4/00

"

"

"

"

Trubidity 0.3 NTU* 1.00 11/19/92 " "

< means less than, > means greater than.

Note: *NTU = Nephelometric Turbidity Units

Table 10 shows results for testing for certain important inorganics in 1997 and 2000. The testing is on a three year cycle. These inorganic constituents occur naturally in the soil and environment. The new (2002) State Water Supply Rule includes a 10 ppb standard for Arsenic which is reflected in the above table, and which will go into effect in 2006. The previous Arsenic standard was 50ppb. Iron and manganese are not health related contaminants and so are not required to be tested for. We test for these minerals because they can represent nuisance constituents. As discussed below, we treat for manganese. Cadmium may occur as a stray metal in galvanized pipes.

TABLE 11

Parameter Level Detected Units SMCL Sample Date Violation Probable Source
Iron 0.10

0.11

0.52

mg/l(ppm) 0.300

0.300 0.300

11/19/92

3/17/99

7/13/99

NO

NO

NO

Natural

 

Manganese 0.079

0.14

0.263

mg/l(ppm) 0.050 0.050

0.050

11/19/92

3/17/99

7/13/00

YES*

YES*

YES*

Natural

 

Odor None T.O.N.*** 3 11/19/92 NO  
Sulfate 16 mg/l(ppm) 250 11/19/92 NO  
Alkalinity 86 mg/l(ppm) --- 11/19/92 NO Natural
Ca as CaCO3 81 mg/l(ppm) --- 11/19/92 NO Natural

 

Chloride 13 mg/l(ppm) 250 11/19/92 NO Natural
Color <5.0 color units 15 11/19/92 NO  
Foaming Agents <0.1 mg/l(ppm) 0.5 11/19/92 NO  
Zinc <0.05 mg/l(ppm) 5 11/19/92 NO  
Silver <0.005 mg/l(ppm) 0.1 11/19/92 NO  
Sodium 6 mg/l(ppm) 250 11/19/92 NO Natural
pH 8.1 pH units 6.5 to 8.5 11/19/92 NO  
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) 139 mg/l(ppm) 500 11/19/92 NO Natural
Calculated Langelier Index -0.20   >0 is

Non-

corrosive

11/19/92 YES**  

*No adverse health affects, can discolor water and stain fixtures.

** No adverse health affects, slightly corrosive.

*** Notes: T.O.N. = Threshold Odor Number.

The district water is from a large aquifer estimated by Groundwater Associates, the hydrogeologists that test pumped the aquifer, to sustain 500 gallons per minute for 16 hours per day. Typical measured values of water pH and hardness are pH = 7.8 and hardness = 110 mg/L respectively. These parameters indicate a relatively stable water quality which does not readily dissolve heavy metals. We are truly blessed with this precious water which emanates from the hills and meadows of Underhill and Jericho.

Violation(s) That Occurred During the Year 2002

There were no water quality or monitoring violations during the time period covered by this report.

Additional Information

Operations

The Jericho-Underhill Water District Board oversees the operation and administration of various activities and operations to provide a safe drinking water within the District to its customers, visitors and transients. It performs this duty through its operators in concert with the state's drinking water program which maintains offices in Waterbury, Vermont.

Water Treatment

The water is treated by the addition of polyphosphate, fluoride, and chlorine.

- Polyphosphate.

Manganese is present at a level which exceeds the secondary standard (non-health hazard) of 0.05 mg/L. Polyphosphate is added for aesthetic reasons in accordance with generally accepted water system practice to prevent the precipitation of manganese. Manganese precipitate may form a brownish film in bathroom fixtures or dishwashers, but is not a health hazard. One part per million (1ppm) of a polyphosphate is added as a sequestering agent to the water to keep the manganese in solution. The standard (not to exceed) for polyphosphate is 10 ppm.

- Chlorine

Chlorine is added to control bacteria which may enter the water system at the site of a leak or during repairs. Since 1998, chlorine has been kept at low levels as a precautionary measure. The state recommends chlorine treatment when (poly)phosphate is added for treatment purposes because the phosphate acts as a nutrient for various organisms. The board periodically reviews the need for chlorine treatment.

- Polyphosphate and Chlorine Interaction.

Occasionally the board has found that the chlorine treatment precipitates manganese before the polyphosphate sequestering reaction occurs. The board addressed this problem prior to 2001 by upgrading the treatment delivery pumps to provide better control and mixing of the treatment materials with the manganese.

-Sodium fluoride.

Sodium fluoride is added to the water to aid in preventing dental caries and to help strengthen bones, as recommended by the State Department of Health. The amount maintained is between 1.1 and 1.3 mg/L which is at the optimum range to enhance tooth formation and prevent cavities. The standard (not to exceed) is 4.0 mg/L and the amount shall be maintained at less than 2.0 mg/L to insure mottling of teeth does not occur.

If you have questions about this report or other matters regarding your drinking water, please call 899-2660 or one of your board members. For a copy, you may call Jane Maheux at 899-3810.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Peter H. Mitchell, President

Richard H. Eldred, Trustee

Roger F. Koniuto, Trustee

 

Pay Bill Online

Visa.jpgMasterCard.jpgdiscover.jpgecheck.jpg


good hits
Websites Statistics Tool